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How to Get Rid of Chest Congestion Best Home Remedies



How to Get Rid of Chest Congestion Best Home Remedies

Lemon and Honey
Honey is one of nature’s most healing foods, and is known to be one of the most effective natural cough suppressants. The antibacterial properties in honey are great for reducing infection in the respiratory tract that often leads to chest congestion. Lemon also has plenty of the vitamin C your body desperately needs to fight infection. Hot water, honey, and lemon juice can be put together and taken like hot tea. Drinking this mixture three to four times a day will help to greatly ease congestion in the chest.
Ginger Tea
Ginger has long been used to fight inflammation in the respiratory tract. Ginger candies are a sweet way to help suppress coughs and can prove to be very soothing for uncomfortable symptoms. Thinly slicing about a thumb-sized piece of ginger and simmering it in hot water is a great way to make a tea that will help a lot with chest congestion. Adding a bit of honey will only further enhance the benefits of this tea.
Eucalyptus Oil
The power of nature truly is unprecedented when it comes to taking care of the human body. Eucalyptus oil is full of antibacterial and analgesic properties that help fight infection that has found its way into the respiratory tract. To use this powerful healer, heat a pot of water and add a few drops of eucalyptus oil. Cover your head as well as the pot with a towel and breathe in the vapors. These will make their way into the lungs and make you feel almost instant relief. Doing this two or three times a day will prove for faster results.
Drink More Water
Drinking at least eight ounces of water is recommended for each day even when you aren’t suffering from chest congestion. Increasing the amount of water you drink when you’re hit with a congested chest will help break up the congestion that is caused by an accumulation of phlegm and mucus. Drinking more water will help tremendously to allow you to easier cough up phlegm and mucus.
Eat Something Spicy
We all know how our noses run when we eat something spicy. This happens because spicy foods tend to loosen up phlegm. Garlic, chilies, and black pepper all act as decongestants and are highly encouraged to naturally ease chest congestion at home. They can be added to foods or be taken by themselves. Adding a teaspoon or two into a cup of warm water and lemon is an excellent way to loosen phlegm and get your mucus moving.
Black Licorice
Black licorice seems to be one of those foods you either love or hate. If the latter is the case, you may want to choose this natural remedy the next time you’re experiencing congestion in your chest. It is considered by many as a natural cough medicine and has been used for hundreds of years for this very reason. Licorice root tea is available at most health food stores or can be made at home using about a half teaspoon of the root simmered in hot water. Drinking licorice tea a few times a day will help to quickly ease chest congestion and get you on the way to feeling like new.
As with anything, no single remedy is going to be right for everyone. Finding the right one for you will definitely be a personal decision and based on your own unique needs. Trying a few of the above-mentioned remedies will all help differently for different people. They have all been proven time and time again to help ease symptoms of chest congestion and provide much needed relief.
The next time you’re suffering from chest congestion and need some immediate relief, look no further than these great home remedies. Nature gives us everything our bodies need to heal, and is an excellent way to take care of your health in a holistic and safe manner.

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